Artist, Designer, Traveler, Writer, Photographer

THE ANALOGY SERIES-RIVER, STONES

One of the major themes of ” THE THREADS PROJECT” is the concept of analogies, things which look alike or share similar characteristics. The idea for using analogous images was one of the original methods in The Threads Project for blurring the distinction between art and craft by pairing images which used elements from both. The viewer would then find it difficult to make an immediate judgment of value when viewing the work. This idea expanded over time to go beyond pairs.

With the analogy idea in mind, I decided to begin a tall, vertical series of pieces that would combine paper and cloth supports and combine fine art materials and techniques with textile elements. In my original notes of 4/4/2003, I list many options for materials and methods such as paper, canvas, organdy, Pellon, and screenprinting fabric. I contemplated using resist and discharge methods, sgraffito,  layers, frottage, and collage. With these I considered using acrylic, airbrush ink, pastel, molding paste, crayon, and thread.

I envisioned the series as four, six or more vertical pieces, each  roughly six feet high by three or four feet wide and relating to each other perhaps by motif and color as well as a mix of media and supports. The first completed piece was a pastel and acrylic paper on my favorite paper, Japanese Okawara, titled “Analogy I-Forest”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALOGY I-FOREST 2003  Pastel and acrylic on Okawara paper  72 x 39.5″

The branch-like motif relates to earlier work using a twig-like motif in textile pieces and drawings (see “Old Traditions, New Art”). The layers of “stones” at the lower edge of the work would be a theme for many works in many media in the future.

The branch-like motif relates to earlier work using a twig-like motif in textile pieces and drawings (see “Old Traditions, New Art”). The layers of “stones” at the lower edge of the work would be a theme for many works in many media in the future.

“River, Stones” (below) was intended as the second in this series. Here I began by using a tightly-woven silk and black fluid acrylic paint, making gestural strokes on the surface. Over a period of six months, with many moments of uncertainty, I began to build up the surface. Black cotton for the “stones”, layers of various colored tulle and stitches binding all together. In the end, I realized that this could not be a vertical piece; it was in fact, a memory of a little river I had lived on shortly before. I had stood overlooking it watching the schools of fish, aquatic plants, and sunlight playing through the currents.

RIVER, STONES resized

  RIVER, STONES  2003-2004  Acrylic, cotton, tulle, thread, on silk mounted to cotton 35 x 68″

I realize, looking now at the professional photos taken of this that much of the dimensional quality of the surface is lost. So I have taken detail photos to eliminate the flat quality and give an idea of how the surface is affected by the stitches and the paint. There is, in fact, a more relief-like effect created by allowing these methods to react to the silk.

The next two works in the “Analogy” Series would not come until some time later, with “Analogy II-Shards” and “Analogy III-Terrain” created in 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALOGY II-SHARDS 2006  Acrylic, pastel, marker on unprimed canvas  79.5 x 48″

Here the “twig-mark” motif has given way to the motif which evolved from the “stitch-mark”, the triangular stitch that began in textile pieces and soon morphed into drawings, paintings, and works on paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALOGY III-TERRAIN  2006  Acrylic on Okawara paper  72.75 x 39.5″

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